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Hinduists Demand the Australian Company Withdraw Cards with Their Gods

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The Australian online store MyDeal.com.au, must withdraw its deck of virtual cards at the request of the president of the Universal Society of Hinduism, Rajan Zed. Hinduists have been offended by the article described as inappropriate in which images of some of their deities are shown.

Zed said it was disrespectful to place in the decks of highly revered Hindu deities such as Brahma, Shiva, Vishnu, Lakshmi, Krishna, Saraswati, Parvati or Radha, among others. In addition, to request that the article “Divine Art Playing Cards Hindu Mythology” be removed from the online store, the Indian representative is looking for the company’s CEO to offer a formal apology.

The award-winning online store that was launched in 2012, describes itself as “Australia’s most reliable online marketplace”, as well as “leaders in retail and technology in Australia.” The company that offers a diversity of products for the home, has 500,000 customers and a volume of parcels sent throughout Australia exceeding 2 million packages.

“The mentioned element presents images of several Hindu deities, so it was labeled highly inappropriate”

Zed said in a statement issued in Nevada (USA) that Hindu deities are sacred to Hinduism and their banalization disturbs the religious community throughout the world.

He also stressed that the Hindu gods are to be worshiped in temples or shrines and not to be thrown or shuffled in card games with unwashed hands. This includes card games, poker at casinos and other venues and entertainment “hand games.”

He emphasized that the inappropriate use of their deities, as well as Hindu concepts or symbols in any other type of commercial items, was not good, because they harm the devout population. He said that although Hindus respected the free expression of thought and artistic expression, they considered matters of faith to be sacred.

Similar problems with other companies

Other companies have faced similar problems with the Hindu community, since it is not the first time they have been asked to remove problematic products from the market and apologize.

The most recent case of another problematic product was Ganesha Gold Slot, which produced the Pocket Games Soft company that Zed also demanded to withdraw from its catalog and offer an apology by stating that “the symbols of any faith, larger or smaller, they should not be mishandled.”

The endorphina online software provider at the end of 2018 also faced similar problems and was urged to withdraw the Durga Slot product from the market. The Hinduists considered that the game associated the Hindu deity of positive divine forces also with “inappropriate content.”

Merkur, the Gausselmann group division, was asked in December 2014 to eliminate the Shiva slot, because it used some gods in the game content.

Hinduism has a great philosophical wealth. It is the oldest religion in the world and the third largest on the planet with some 1.1 billion followers. In Australia it is one of the fastest growing religions with around 440,000 believers, according to the 2016 census.

Source:
https://lcb.org/news/rajan-zed-seeks-a-formal-apology-from-australian-company-offering-playing-cards-with-hindu-gods

About the author

Santiago Contreras

Santiago Contreras

I am a professional journalist dedicated to tracking news related to the stock market, business, finance, blockchain and economics. It is a hobby that I share with sports in general, with special attention to tennis, basketball and soccer. I like to offer our readers relevant, entertaining and useful content to help them inform themselves and make decisions every day. Thanks for reading me!

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